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20121202
20121210
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. the positive side, again, hurricane sandy appears not to have been the job killer many had feared. the labor department says the havoc wrought by sandy had no substantial impact on the unemployment picture. with us now, jill schlessinger, editor at la w manyre the jobs aart me ,ow m t are seasonal jobs? >> not so many seasonal. we saw some broad based gains and we continue to see some really robust gains in retail, in business services, health care is really continuing to show great improvement. you mentioned manufacturing. mentioned one other area, 20,000 jobs lost in construction. that may be a little bit of sandy related. >> but also, one of the interesting things, you looked at the numbers and said there was 300,000 people that said weather did affect the job surge. why is that not considered sandy related? >> it is weird because there are two different surveys when you look at these jobs numbers. one comes from the businesses. the businesses, they take that survey, november 12th, and the businesses are for the job creation number. the other survey is called a household survey. that's h
not only because of the election, maybe firms sitting on their hands but superstorm sandy. still, guys, the number much better than expected. few tuesday, which were down right before the numbers hit, turned around. they are now higher fractionally so a big turn for stock futures and better than expected jobs number for november. i can dig in more once i get to the website. but those are your headline numbers. better than expected. >> gillian, better than expected. a lot of people blamed hurricane sandy again but that's encouraging. >> i have two economists, a liberal, who both said it was going to be somewhere between 80,000 and 100,000 jobs -- say that go sandy was worth 80 -- negatively 80,000 to 100,000. you take 146,000 and this could have been a 200-plus number. >> it's interesting because it ties in with consumer data we've been seeing which actually, you know, is not great. it's not buoyant, but it's not bad. and you look at the fact what american households have been doing recently with debt and the degree of debt they've been repaying, sort of deleveraging. you add it togethe
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2

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